Are you ready for the revival of video?

Like the resurgence in interest for vinyl records, video tapes could see a revival according to reports.

 

After the first video cassette recorder (VCR) went on sale at Dixons in 1978, demand for VCRs fell due to the rise of DVD players in the 1990s.

 

But the past few years have seen a huge influx in VHS collectors according to Daily Grindhouse.  Video collectors say films made for VHS look strange when cleaned up for higher-definition DVDs. They prefer the grainer quality of the VHS format, in the same way a vinyl collector might speak about the warmth of a record’s sound.

 

“These are movies that feel too cleaned-up on DVD and Blu-ray, as if they were never meant to look that good. Watching them on VHS is closer to the way the director intended it to look,” Dan Kinem, a VHS collector, told Collectors Weekly.

 

People wanting to reminisce with their old films on their trusty video cassette recorder (VCR) will need a projector to create the full cinema experience.  But modern-day projectors don’t always come with the inputs needed to connect with the older VCR technology.

 

VCRs would not have a HDMI output that can connect to the HDMI inputs in most modern projectors. It is more than likely you will need to use either the composite or S-video ports. 

 

So, if you want to dust off your video classics, you will need to choose a projector carefully to ensure that it has all the inputs that you need.  The Optoma HD36 is a good option as it is bright, has fantastic picture quality but, more importantly, has the plethora of inputs to ensure it is compatible with all devices – both modern and historic.  These include composite and S-video.

 

Composite video cables have a small, metal-tipped plug (also known as a RCA plug) which is usually yellow.  S-Video cables have a slightly larger plug with a series of small, delicate-looking pins jutting out of each end.  If the VCR is really old, it may have a SCART output for which you can get SCART to composite adaptor or cable.

 

You will also need to connect sound from the VCR to the projector via a set of stereo RCA plugs.  These are usually red for the left channel and white for the right.

 

Those that remember, and still have, laser disc players which played vinyl analogue video - the forerunner to DVD - will most likely need to use the SCART to composite adaptor to connect to the projector.